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dc.contributor.advisorFilner, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorMaloney, Kathleen
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-30T20:15:18Z
dc.date.available2009-11-30T20:15:18Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10920/11520
dc.descriptioniv, 31 p.
dc.description.abstractThe way in which Americans think about the poor has changed over the last 40 years. At one time, being poor was an economic condition. Poverty was a problem of individuals, by that I mean that becoming impoverished was something that happened to individuals. People could enter into or escape poverty as individuals. Throughout the last half of the 20th century being poor ceased to be an economic condition and became a group classification. A social group is "a collective of persons differentiated from at least one other group by cultural forms, practices or a way of life" (Young 1990, 43). In order for people to be classified into groups, generalizations about group members must be made. The poor in the United States have become a group. During the development of the concept of the poor as a group, the poor were attributed behavioral characteristics by non-poor Americans. Thinking about the poor as a group with social characteristics has alienated the poor from participating in mainstream America's culture. Much of the development of the concept of the poor as a group took place through the development of the concept of an underclass. As the poor became increasingly identified as members of the underclass, they became increasingly oppressed. "Oppression ..... .is something that happens to people when they are classified in groups. Because others identify them as a group, they are excluded and despised" (Young 1990, 47). Due to the development of the underclass as a group separate from mainstream America, anti-poor biases have increased. Throughout the last 40 years increasing stigmatization of the poor through the development of the concept of the underclass as a group has led to decreased support for government use of fiscal policy to address issues of poverty. Analysis of the history of attitudes about the poor and governmental poverty policies demonstrates this point. The first section of this paper addresses attitudes towards the poor and subsequent policy decisions. The following sections outline the development of attitudes and policies throughout the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. The final section contains conclusions about the nature of those developments as well as a critique of the legitimacy of the development of the concept of the underclass as a group and its subsequent effect on federal government poverty policies.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofKalamazoo College Political Science Senior Individualized Projects Collection
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSenior Individualized Projects. Political Science.;
dc.rightsU.S. copyright laws protect this material. Commercial use or distribution of this material is not permitted without prior written permission of the copyright holder.
dc.titleAmerica's Anti-Poor Bias And Its Influence on Poverty Policyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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  • Kalamazoo College Guilds: Justice and Peace SIPs [733]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) that deal with issues of justice and peace. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.
  • Political Science Senior Individualized Projects [769]
    This collection includes Senior Individualized Projects (SIP's) completed in the Political Science Department. Abstracts are generally available to the public, but PDF files are available only to current Kalamazoo College students, faculty, and staff.

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